Category Archives: Strategy

My top ten predictions for 2015

1. 2015 will have 365 days, approximately

2. GovCamp will take place on 24 January at Microsoft

3. The Government Digital Service will employ more people

4. Some IT projects will fail

5. I will not be in the New Year’s Honours (again)

6. There will be more talk about a Local Government Digital Service – which will still come to nothing

7. Data will become big, very big; and open data will become even bigger and opener (? Ed) – the number of people really getting it will probably remain the same

8. Government digital folk will remain as great as ever, sharing, caring and doing great stuff

9. We will still detest Facebook and still keep using it and start to detest Twitter – then detest ourselves for using these tools and for being detestable

10. There will be more social media ‘disasters’ and data takeaways (by those naughty black hatters)

11. Our personal data will be shared more freely than a post on Plague

12. There will be more Buzzfeeding of content – er this list

13. People will forget how to count up to ten

 

 

Community managers – who do they manage and which community?

Last week I provided the space for an event that we grandly called the Community Managers Camp. These are my reflections on this event.

Firstly which Community Managers attended the event?

All the people were, as far as I know, from central government. To me that was a shame as I would have liked to have some colleagues from local government also be present.

The other thing that was highlighted was that some people thought the event was purely for social media community managers, funnily enough that had not occurred to me, or some of the other community managers present, whose role was to help build specialist internal communities around some tech issues.

This highlighted that we all have our preconceptions about what kind of community managers exist.

As the discussion progressed it became clear that there were a number of common issues such as generic tech problems; problems with other teams in the same organisation and other fairly familiar points from the digital engagement perspective.

We then turned to the question of which communities were actually being managed which is when the conversation became rather fascinating.

We seemed to conclude that the initial remit of a community manager was to manage external communities and examples were given of good achievements in this area.

However it then become apparent that community managers wanted to spend more time managing their internal communities. The reason being that it was people inside the organisation who should be digitally capable and best placed to interact and manage their own external online communities. The community managers role then should be to facilitate this happening. So, in theory, by managing internal communities external communities are better managed by the people best suited to do so.

So if you are a community manager does any of this sound familiar and match your aspirations?

Micro actions lead to macro results

Sometimes when we want a big result we think we need to put in one huge effort to get that result. But is that really true? Will the revision the night before the exam get that pass mark or the steady re-reading of notes over the previous months?

What if lots of small actions add up to something bigger than each of the actions themselves?

Here are some examples:

Building a online audience – regularly thanking retweeters on Twitter so that they want to do it again and have a nice warm glowly feeling towards you.

Improving the quality of your website user experience – fixing a few broken links every day so that the number of 404s keep reducing.

Managing staff – giving encouraging words to colleagues on a regular basis.

Improving your website – the steady fixing of bugs that keeps improving the site.

Building your online reputation – writing small but regular blog posts (this is an example).

Having a nice garden – pulling out a weed a day.

You can probably think of your own examples.

Micro leads to macro – did I hear ‘from little acorns, oaks’?